15. Real-time results

Since JMeter 2.13 you can get real-time results sent to a backend through the Backend Listener using potentially any backend (JDBC, JMS, Webservice, …) by providing a class which implements AbstractBackendListenerClient.
JMeter ships with a GraphiteBackendListenerClient which allows you to send metrics to a Graphite Backend.
This feature provides:

In this document we will present the configuration setup to graph and historize the data in 2 different backends:

15.1 Metrics exposed

15.1.1 Thread/Virtual Users metrics

Thread metrics are the following:

<rootMetricsPrefix>test.minAT
Min active threads
<rootMetricsPrefix>test.maxAT
Max active threads
<rootMetricsPrefix>test.meanAT
Mean active threads
<rootMetricsPrefix>test.startedT
Started threads
<rootMetricsPrefix>test.endedT
Finished threads

15.1.2 Response times metrics

Response related metrics are the following:

<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ok.count
Number of successful responses for sampler name
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.h.count
Server hits per seconds, this metric cumulates Sample Result and Sub results (if using Transaction Controller, "Generate parent sampler" should be unchecked)
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ok.min
Min response time for successful responses of sampler name
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ok.max
Max response time for successful responses of sampler name
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ok.avg
Average response time for successful responses of sampler name.
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ok.pct<percentileValue>
Percentile computed for successful responses of sampler name. There will be one metric for each calculated value.
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ko.count
Number of failed responses for sampler name
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ko.min
Min response time for failed responses of sampler name
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ko.max
Max response time for failed responses of sampler name
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ko.avg
Average response time for failed responses of sampler name.
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.ko.pct<percentileValue>
Percentile computed for failed responses of sampler name. There will be one metric for each calculated value.
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.a.count
Number of responses for sampler name (sum of ok.count and ko.count)
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.a.min
Min response time for responses of sampler name (min of ok.count and ko.count)
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.a.max
Max response time for responses of sampler name (max of ok.count and ko.count)
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.a.avg
Average response time for responses of sampler name (avg of ok.count and ko.count)
<rootMetricsPrefix><samplerName>.a.pct<percentileValue>
Percentile computed for responses of sampler name. There will be one metric for each calculated value. (calculated on the totals for OK and failed samples)

The default percentiles setting on the Backend Listener is "90;95;99", i.e. the 3 percentiles 90%, 95% and 99%.

The Graphite naming hierarchy uses dot (".") to separate elements. This could be confused with decimal percentile values. JMeter converts any such values, replacing dot (".") with underscore ("-"). For example, "99.9" becomes "99_9"

By default JMeter sends metrics for all samplers accumulated under the samplerName "all". If the Backend Listener samplersList is configured, then JMeter also sends the metrics for the matching sample names unless summaryOnly=true

15.2 JMeter configuration

To make JMeter send metrics to backend add a BackendListener using the GraphiteBackendListenerClient.

Graphite configuration
Graphite configuration

15.2 InfluxDB

InfluxDB is an open-source, distributed, time-series database that allows to easily store metrics. Installation and configuration is very easy, read this for more details InfluxDB documentation.
InfluxDB data can be easily viewed in a browser through either Influga or Grafana. We will use Grafana in this case.

15.2.1 InfluxDB graphite listener configuration

To enable Graphite listener in InfluxDB, edit files /opt/influxdb/shared/config.toml or /usr/local/etc/influxdb.conf, find "[[graphite]]" and set this:

# Configure the graphite api
[[graphite]]
enabled = true
bind-address = ":2003" # If not set, is actually set to bind-address.
database = "jmeter"  # store graphite data in this database
    

15.2.2 InfluxDB database configuration

Connect to InfluxDB using influx shell and create two databases:

  • grafana : Used by Grafana to store the dashboards we will create
  • jmeter : Used by InfluxDB to store the data sent to Graphite Listener as per database="jmeter" config element in influxdb.conf or config.toml

15.2.3 Grafana configuration

Installing grafana is just a matter of putting the unzipped bundle behind an Apache HTTP server.
Read documentation for more details. Open config.js file and find datasources element, and edit it like this:

datasources: {
  influxdb: {
    type: 'influxdb',
    url: "http://influx_db_host:8086/db/jmeter",
    username: 'root',
    password: 'root',
  },
  grafana: {
    type: 'influxdb',
    url: "http://influx_db_host:8086/db/grafana",
    username: 'root',
    password: 'root',
    grafanaDB: true
  },
},
    
Note that grafana has "grafanaDB:true". Also note that here we use root user for simplicity It is better to dedicate a special user with restricted rights.
Here is the kind of dashboard that you could obtain:
Grafana dashboard
Grafana dashboard

15.3 Graphite

HELP WELCOME for this section, see Contributing documentation